Foster Care

Protect your child from foster care seek assistance immediately upon notification of DCF involvement.

Foster Care

Foster care is a very dangerous place. We know by recent studies conducted involving placement in foster care that only one in five foster children become productive citizens. Children placed in foster care are three times more likely to be subjected to abuse or neglect. Children who are left in their home rather than placed in foster care are less likely to be involved in the juvenile justice system, pregnant, or unemployed.

July 3, 2007

Study: Troubled homes better than foster care:

By Wendy Koch, USA TODAY

A 2007 study on foster care found Children left in their own homes are far less likely to become pregnant as teenagers, far less likely to wind up in the juvenile justice system and far more likely to hold a job for at least three months than comparably maltreated children who were placed in foster care….

Doyle’s study, however, provides “the first viable, empirical evidence” of the benefits of keeping kids with their families, says Gary Stangler, executive director of the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative, a foundation for foster teens. Stangler says it looked at kids over a longer period of time than had other studies.

FAMILY INFLUENCE

Children who stay in troubled families fare better than those put into foster care. Those who:

Were arrested at least once:

• Stayed with family:

14%

• Went to foster care:

44%

Became teen mothers:

• Stayed with family:

33%

• Went to foster care:

56%

Held a job at least 3 months:

• Stayed with family:

33%

• Went to foster care:

20%

Source: Study by Joseph Doyle, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

March 29, 2005 Cold cases Foster care tragedies remain mysteries In the wake of the traumatic death of a 4-year-old boy placed in foster care in Dorchester, Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino is asking police to revisit the decade-old unsolved murders of two children, both in foster care. Michelle Walton, 9, was killed in October 1994 and Gage Guillen, 3, in September 1995. A Boston Herald report notes that no arrests or charges have been brought in either case. Boston’s unsolved cases concerning children entrusted to foster care are by no means unique. In Worcester, an even more perplexing case remains unsolved, and largely forgotten, six-plus years after the fact. On Nov. 5, 1998, 5-month-old Marlon Devine Santos disappeared from the Worcester foster home in which he had been placed. To this day, it is unknown what fate befell the infant. The investigation has been controversial from the beginning. The adults responsible for Baby Marlon’s well-being, including his foster parents, Jose M. and Yolanda Castillo, and his mother, Dina Santos, showed little interest in cooperating with authorities. Investigators were unable to determine even whether the boy was dead or alive, and the case all-too-quickly went cold. The investigation appeared to be heating up when District Attorney John J. Conte led a high-profile search, shortly before the first anniversary of Baby Marlon’s disappearance, of woods along Route 70 near Wachusett Reservoir. The search and subsequent inquiries by a special grand jury were to no avail. Compounding the tragedy, authorities later learned that the foster father had a criminal record in Puerto Rico, including assault, armed robbery and other serious crimes — a chilling revelation given that between 1992 and 1998, the state Department of Social Services had placed 52 foster children in the Castillo home. More than six years after his unexplained disappearance, Baby Marlon’s case is heart-rending still. We urge Mr. Conte to take a cue from Boston and revisit this disturbing case.

In 2005 Massachusetts legislative committee found that children in state care were often worse off than they were in the original homes from which they were removed.

March 10, 2005

A Critical Look At The Foster Care System How Safe the Service?

http://www.liftingtheveil.org/foster03.htm

In Massachusetts, the Department of Social Services has knowingly approved scores of convicted criminals to be foster parents, including child abusers, drug dealers, habitual drunk drivers, kidnappers, armed robbers, and other violent offenders, according a recent Boston Globe series. The Department of Social Services allowed these criminals to become foster parents by granting “waivers” that would ordinarily have caused the foster parents to be rejected.[9] This may explain–at least in part–why after a five-month investigation based on hundreds of interviews with Department workers, court personnel and families, a Massachusetts legislative committee found that children in state care were often worse off than they were in the original homes from which they were removed.[10] “The state’s foster care system has been racked by tragedy in recent years,” note Boston Globe reporters. “In the past three years, several foster children have been murdered or have died from neglect, while others have been horrifically abused.”[28] In 1995, at least eight children died while in foster care in Massachusetts, and federal officials were threatening a private lawsuit against the agency if changes weren’t made.[29] But the most telli

February 20, 2004

Foster care records full of errors

Computer system used for tracking children Foster care records full of errors

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, Steve LeBlanc

BOSTON- The state’s $50 million computer system for tracking children in foster care is riddled with errors, according to a report released yesterday by state Auditor A. Joseph DeNucci.

The report found the Department of Social Service’s main foster care computer system, known as FamilyNet, has a 67 percent error rate, based on auditors’ review of more than 4,000 cases in the system. The system is used to make key decisions about foster families.

Among the problems auditors said they found were incorrect and missing dates needed to determine when children were placed with foster families and whether foster care providers had undergone required criminal background checks.

1995 AGENCY THREATENS COURT RULE OF DSS \ 48 CHILD DEATHS PROMPT

According to the Executive Office of Health and Human Services, 48 children in DSS care had died this year – 12 were in foster care – as of Dec. 6. Several cases of child abuse have made headlines.

2004 the state’s $50 million computer system for tracking children in foster care is riddled with errors. The report found the Department of Social Service’s main foster care computer system, known as FamilyNet, has a 67 percent error rate, based on auditors’ review of more than 4,000 cases in the system. The system is used to make key decisions about foster families.

Among the problems auditors said they found were incorrect and missing dates needed to determine when children were placed with foster families and whether foster care providers had undergone required criminal background checks.

Children First Advocacy and or their employees or sub contractors do not provide legal advice in any situation. Children First Advocacy provides services associated with procedural actions concerning allegations child abuse or neglect and educational issues facing children and families in Massachusetts.